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The 4 Best Scopes for Scar 17 – Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by Keary O. / CC BY The Scar 17 is one of the most modern, heavy hitting battle rifles out there. Designed by FN and marketed to the Special Operation community, the SCAR 17 has the ergonomics of an assault rifle but with the powerful .

The 4 Best Scopes for Scar 17 – Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by Keary O. / CC BY The Scar 17 is one of the most modern, heavy hitting battle rifles out there. Designed by FN and marketed to the Special Operation community, the SCAR 17 has the ergonomics of an assault rifle but with the powerful .308 chambering. Because the Scar 17 is a precise rifle, it needs a good quality optic to take advantage of its max range. The 7.62 NATO/ .308 Winchester round is a heavyweight quite unlike the dainty 5.56mm. This means any optic topping the Scar 17 needs to be strong and resistant to recoil. A good optic needs to compliment the Scar and take advantage of its seamless ability to transition from a designated marksman rifle to a hard hitting close-quarters battle weapon. Here, in our humble opinion, are the 4 best Scopes for Scar 17 rifles: Trijicon ACOG BR .308 Trijicon TA11J-308 ACOG 3.5x35mm Dual Illuminatedx 40mm, Red Crosshair .308 Ballistic Reticle with TA51 Mount, Black Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 15:45 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. If money were no object, this is the best scope for Scar 17 period. The Trijicon ACOG is well known for its military use on standard M4 and M16 rifles. However, these rifles are chambered in the 5.56mm, and the reticle and bullet drop compensator is ineffective on the .308 round. A Scar 17 needs the ACOG BR .308 (the BR stands for ballistic reticle). This ACOG by Trijicon is specifically tailored for the .308 round and takes bullet drop into account. This is in the form of a BDC that shows the user where the exact holdover is for certain ranges. The Trijicon ACOG ( see full specs ) has a 3.5x level of magnification and a 35mm objective lens. The model comes with either a green or red reticle that is illuminated but completely battery free. The scope uses a combination of tritium and fiber optics to absorb light and provide internal illumination. The optic is nearly a pound and 8 inches in length so it’s no slouch in the size department. However, the Trijicon ACOG optics are known for their last lasting durability and bulletproof strength. The ACOG brand has proven itself through two wars and a decade of experience. This is an optic even a Marine can’t break. The Trijicon ACOG compliments a Scar 17 very well and allows the rifle to act as both a close quarters and ranged battle rifle. Rock River LAR 8 - 300 yd steel - Trijicon ACOG (TA11J-308) Watch this video on YouTube

[Hands-On Review] Romeo 3 vs Romeo 5 from Sig Sauer

[Hands-On Review] Romeo 3 vs Romeo 5 from Sig Sauer

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking for a new red dot? Need something with long-term battery life? Sig’s Romeo line-up may be the right choice for your needs. (left) Sig Sauer Romeo3 and (right) Romeo5 I ran the Romeo3 and Romeo5 over the last couple of months and put them through some brutal testing and evaluation. By the end you’ll know if one of them is right for you. An Optic for Any Budget Between these two optics from Sig Sauer, they offer two great options depending on your budget. Currently, the Romeo3 comes in around the $320 mark without a riser. "Sig Sauer Romeo3" 320 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 320 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A price tag of $320 is a large step up in price compared to red dot optics in the $100-250 price range, but it does offer some features that typical “tube style” red dots don’t have. Most notably the amazing field of view that this optic offers using both eyes open while shooting. Sig M400 Tread with Romeo5 and included riser mount. The Romeo5 is more of a conventional “tube style” red dot. It can be found for $119, or even cheaper at "Palmetto State Armory" . It comes standard with a riser mount to co-witness with typical AR15 iron sights. Brutally Tested Budget Red Dot Sig Sauer Romeo5 149 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The price point that the Romeo 5 offers is very solid . For a recreational firearm, or for a light-use, home defense carbine for someone on a smaller budget, this 2 MOA dot packs a lot of features in a solid design. The Future is Now One of the coolest and most efficient features that both the Romeo3 and Romeo5 have is the “MOTAC” system. It is a motion sensing feature that will turn off the optic after 2 minutes of being idle. After sensing motion, the optic will immediately turn back on at its previous setting. This feature greatly increases battery life and allows the shooter to leave the optic on. Once the firearm is stored, the optic can be left on, but will not use battery power unless picked up and moved. For the Romeo5, this allows the unit to have a 40,000+ hour battery life, but obviously YMMV depending on use and temperature it is stored at. On top of the “MOTAC” motion activation system, the optics also have a specialized Spectracoat lens coating. This coating helps increase battery life by allowing a shooter to keep the brightness level on a lower setting but still allowing maximum visibility of the 3 MOA dot on the Romeo3 or 2 MOA dot on the Romeo5. The Spectracoat is a ruby like coating which provides excellent dot reflection. On the Gun With the Romeo5, the included mount provides for an absolute co-witness with iron sights, as well as the Romeo3. Attaching either of them keeps the irons centered within the field of view of the optics, unlike some cheaper models that may not line up as well. Aesthetically, the Romeo5 is a typical tube-style red dot like more expensive models from Aimpoint. It is a smaller red dot with adjustable brightness settings using a push-button system, instead of a rotating knob located at the battery compartment. Sig Romeo5 with included “TREAD” edition riser mount. The included riser mount is of basic design and works well. It is lightweight but is rather basic. While this will work for a lot of people, some people prefer a better mount using a QD lever, or a skeletonized mount to shave off weight. Luckily, the Romeo5 model that has the removable riser mount seems to be compatible with Aimpoint T2 footprint mounts. The Romeo3 also uses a push-button system, but because of its reflex style system, its battery compartment is a removable disk-style compartment. As mentioned before, the field of view is something to behold with this model. Instead of a bulky tube, this reflex optic has a very thin housing that disappears when shooting with both eyes open. "Sig M400 Tread" with Romeo3. The Sig 62 grain HT ammo proved to be excellent ammo. The model provided to me by Sig came with the riser mount for an absolute co-witness, and a lower mount to attach directly to a picatinny rail. For an AR, this mount will be too low for comfortable use, but for a shotgun, this mount shines. Its footprint is rather large though, so it will probably be too large for handguns, except for the larger framed models. The Beatings Will Stop When Moral Increases Over the course of the last few months, I have shot roughly 1,000 rounds of varying rifle and shotgun ammunition through each of these two models from Sig. The first range visit consisted of zeroing the red dots at ranges of 25, and 50 yards, and shooting at steel out to 300 yards. Both red dots performed well, with the Romeo5 being a little more precise due to its 2 MOA dot at extended ranges. Clarity of glass proved to be very nice with either Sig optic. To fully test out these optics, I decided to run them through different conditions. These tests varied from recoil testing, water immersion, impacts from drops, and extreme cold. Over the course of multiple range trips, the optics were fired on multiple AR15’s from the Sig Sauer M400 Tread, to my own home-rolled rifles, to my Remington 870 DM Predator to increase the force of recoil. Target that shows two 5-shot groups, showing original zero and then remounting. The Romeo3 did exceptionally well with its quick-disconnect mount. After zeroing at 50 yards on the Sig M400 Tread, the optic was taken off and then put through 100 rounds of miscellaneous shotgun loads. Attaching the Romeo3 back onto the M400 Tread in the same spot showed no signs of point of impact change at 50 yards. Submerging both optics in water showed that they are indeed waterproof. They were submerged for 10 minutes , and once pulled out and the exterior dried off, no water or fogging was visible within the tube of the Romeo5, and function wasn’t interrupted with the Romeo3. Between the waterproofing of both optics, and the nitrogen purged tube for the Romeo5, both are buttoned up tight. Splish, splash! The Romeos took a nice bath. They needed it after drop testing. Dropping the optics while mounted showed no signs of zero being disturbed. Dropping was done at knee to shoulder height on different types of terrain including dirt, grass, and rocky terrain. My first worry was with the Romeo3 due to its thin lens housing… No damage besides minor scuff marks appeared on either of the optics. Sig optics after being left in a freezer for 3 hours. Dots did not dim from the cold. Finally, after being left in the freezer at -5 degrees Fahrenheit for 3 hours, both optics showed no overall dimness with their red dot brightness. After doing testing with imported red dots of lesser quality, usually with extreme cold, the electronics could not perform at subzero temperatures. Usually, the dot will go very dim and choke itself out until it gets warmer. Both Sigs proved to handle the cold perfectly fine – great news for those of you in colder states. The Run Down First, lets talk about the Romeo5 .  Here’s some footage of our Editor’s optic used in his backyard. There really isn’t much that I can say bad about it or complain. It is a VERY solid red dot within its price point. Even the push buttons seem sturdy and well made. In a market saturated with imported red dots from China, the Sig Romeo5 really stands out from other big-name companies like Vortex. When you break down the features that the Romeo5, for money it is very hard to come close to what you can get. I am a huge fan of an efficient system. My favorite red dots provide battery life that is measured in years, not by hours. With the “MOTAC” system, battery life is extended into the Trijicon and Aimpoint territory. PWS Diablo with Aimpoint PRO Clarity of glass is also on point. The lenses on the Romeo5 are clear and do not “fishbowl” around the edges like some models. The glass does not take on a darker tint either which can be a complaint in even more expensive red dots. The anodizing on the tube and riser mount are of good quality, and resistant to scratching and damage. Now onto the Romeo3 ! The field of view is amazing. Due to its thin housing at the lens and reflex style, shooting with both eyes open really opens your vision. Depending on eye dominance, even when shooting with both eyes open, tube style optics can still interfere with a shooters field of view. While the housing did not bend, or damage during drop testing, I am still hesitant about it taking too hard of a direct impact. It could just be me overthinking it, but I like things to be overbuilt and bombproof. Casually chilling watching a nuclear detonation… Quality wise the Romeo3 is on a slightly higher level as well. These models are made in Japan which is why the price tag is a bit higher than other Romeo models. Clarity of the glass is great, and the slightly larger 3 MOA dot is brilliant even if it is a bright sunny day. The mount is well made and holds zero very well even after being detached and remounted. The battery tray that is removable without taking the optic off a mount is also a very smart design that even some more expensive models lack. By The Numbers ROMEO5 Affordability: 5/5 For the price point, the Sig Romeo5 is an excellent choice in my opinion. When on sale, and under $150, it provides many features that other companies fall short on. The “MOTAC” system is a game changer and did not fail me in my months of testing. Looks: 4/5 The Romeo5 is a solid looking red dot. Much like the higher priced Aimpoints, the smaller tube style red dots offer a lot of strength in a relatively small package. The mount is a little too plain for my liking, but it does offer a solid attachment point.I’d prefer a lighter cantilever mount, or possibly a QD mount. Reliability: 5/5 The red dot did not fail me in my couple months of torturing it. The “MOTAC” system worked every single time and I left the optic constantly on. Even after multiple drops on varying terrain, the optic refused to quit. Short of going through an explosion, or falling down a mountain, this optic should last for the long haul. Overall: 4.75/5 "Brutally Tested Budget" Red Dot "Sig Sauer Romeo5" 149 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I would highly recommend the Romeo5 for someone on a smaller budget but wants to maximize their purchase. Battery life is fantastic. The “MOTAC” system should be an industry standard, and the 2 MOA dot is precise enough to stretch out to extended ranges when properly zeroed. ROMEO3 Affordability: 3/5 Even when on sale at $399, the Romeo3 hits the wallet hard compared to the Romeo5. Instead of being made in China, it is manufactured in Japan which is one of the big reasons for the expense. For what you get with this optic, the added cost compared to cheaper models might be a hard sale. Looks: 4/5 The Romeo3 has its own style. While the body shape is like other reflex optics, the angled cuts, and the overall size is different. Its hood is one of the thinnest I have seen and provides an excellent field of view while shooting. Personally, I am not a fan of the gray color, but others may love it. Reliability: 5/5 The Romeo3 chugged along over the course of the last few months. The “MOTAC” system did not fail and was left constantly on. Drop testing did not damage or affect the optic, even though I had my worries. The QD mount maintained zero even after remounting after a session on the shotgun. Overall: 3.5/5 Sig Sauer Romeo3 320 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 320 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I enjoyed using the Romeo3 over the last few months. It is a great design and overall would be a great choice for anyone wanting an optic that offers an excellent field of view. My only complaint is the price tag. At $400, personally, I would be looking at other options that have been proven in combat such as the Aimpoint PRO or the Trijcon MRO. Parting Thoughts Both of the Romeos are great choices for optics but what is best for you will depend on the features you’re looking for and the price you’re willing to spend. That said, for the price – the Romeo5 might be the best red dot on the market right now. Do you run the Romeo3 or 5? How do you like it? For some more awesome optics, take a look at the Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics ! A Couple AR-15 Optics

9 Best Concealed Carry Guns (By Popular Caliber) [2020]

9 Best Concealed Carry Guns (By Popular Caliber) [2020]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s What is the best concealed carry gun ? That’s the age-old question, isn’t it? We’ll start by going over popular CCW calibers. Popular Pistol Calibers After you figure out the best for you, we’ll cover some of our top pistol choices. Best Beginner Handguns And finish it with some important accessories such as holsters! EMP Alien Gear Holster Table of Contents Loading... Variables to Consider The size of your piece matters. Aliengear Cloak Tuck 3.0 with XD Mod 2 If you decide to go with a larger caliber or a double stacked magazine, your gun will be physically larger. If you have a thinner or smaller body or like to wear tighter clothing…the fact you’re carrying a gun will be VERY obvious. Concealment Express G19 AIWB, Front Even more so when you’re sitting if you have it at 4 or 5 o’clock. Seated with Aliengear, XD Mod 2 Clothing For those of us in the Midwest, we have, what seems like, 16 months of winter where we wear big jackets and sweatshirts. This allows us to carry just about any caliber CCW we want. Jacket with Holster and Any Gun But, when summer rolls around, that changes. Carrying a full-size .45 ACP is more difficult to conceal in shorts and a t-shirt. Take a look at your style and your seasons to find a good compromise. Possibly owning a gun for winter carry and another one for warmer months. Exposed G19 in Hidden Hybrid Holster Think of it as a seasonal accessory if it helps you justify the purchase. Choosing the Caliber There are a few ways to choose the caliber of your CCW. First is to ask around. My guess is you’ll get a lot of people replying that their carry gun is a 9mm or a .45 ACP. These are probably the most common. Another way is to follow what law enforcement, military, and government agencies use. They tend to do a lot of research into what the bare minimum yet effective caliber or weapons are out there. "Popular Pistol Calibers" What you will see with a lot of these groups is that they went back to 9mm. 147gr 9mm Federal HST Expansion This is because the 9mm has come a long way in the last few years. The .40 S&W was the go-to for a long time, but not really anymore. Something I noticed in my time building police vehicles was the rural departments, and many times sheriffs in rural areas carry .45 ACP. Learn more about acceptable calibers in our Pistol Caliber Overview . Carrying a .22LR While a .22LR can deter an attacker, it is not really recommended for concealed carry. .22LR (CCI vs Winchester vs Super Colibri) If this is your only option, then go for it. Something is better than nothing But, if you are going to purchase something to carry every day, go with a larger caliber. .22lr revolvers like this one are often a great choice for disabled folks looking to defend themselves. Find more recommendations in our article for Disabled Shooters ! If you are in a state that has colder weather, a .22LR will have some difficulties penetrating thicker or multiple layers of clothing. Here is my competition .22LR Buckmark in action… What is likely to happen if you were to use a .22LR and be forced to use it against an attacker wearing a thicker jacket (Carhartt or similar), is the bullet may pierce the jacket and clothing but could struggle to do the appropriate amount of damage needed to disable the attacker. Check out our picks in Best .22s for Pocket Carry . Best Concealed Carry Guns By Caliber Below are a couple of choices for each caliber to help get your search started. I know everyone has their favorites and there will be comments about this gun or that gun should be on or off the list. Feel free to interject, but leave useful comments and suggestions. 9mm The 9mm CCW category is packed with a lot of good choices. 9mm (115gr vs 124gr vs 147 HP) Also, keep in mind that most of the manufacturers make a .40 S&W and a 9mm in the same size frame so I am only listing the 9mm models here. 1. Smith & Wesson M&P Shield What I like about the Smith & Wesson M&P Shield 9mm is it’s a good size to conceal and large enough to get your whole hand on the grip. Smith & Wesson M&P Shield M2.0 420 at Cabela’s Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 420 at Cabela’s Prices accurate at time of writing It’s smaller than a lot of compact guns but bigger than a subcompact. And it’s thin too. About 1” thick. The Shield and Shield 2.0 also come in a variety of calibers, too such as the Shield .380 Auto and Shield .45 ACP If you’re interested in more information, we did a complete review of the S&W Performance Center M&P Shield ! 2. SIG SAUER P365 They call this a “micro-compact.” For its size, it holds a lot of ammo. One of our favorites for 2018! Most innovative CCW gun [2018] Sig Sauer P365 499 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 499 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I would compare it to a Glock 26 in size, but it holds 10+1 and is a single stack magazine. This keeps the width to an inch. It also has a rail if you want to add a light or other attachment. While there have been some production issues of the P365 and some “voluntary” recalls, Sig Sauer seems to have ironed out the issues now. Another PPT writer reviewed the Sig P365 not long ago and wrote a glowing review on it. And now we have a full video review too! Plus there’s tons of upgrade options.  Here’s some of our favorites that we run everyday. P365 Upgrades: The Whole Lot What’s your take on the P365? Readers' Ratings 4.84/5 (1805) Your Rating? 3. Glock 43 Single stacked goodness with Glock’s impeccable reputation for reliability . G43 & Banana Holds 6+1 only but disappears in a holster.  Plus it has a decent grip for a tiny 9mm. Oh…and did we forget…it’s a Glock so it will likely always go *bang * when needed. Check out our full written review and our hands-on video below: If that helped, please subscribe to our YouTube channel since we’re adding new videos every week! Get one for yourself right now… Ultra Reliable Single-Stock CCW Glock 43 449 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 449 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Also, don’t forget to check out which other Glocks made our best Glocks list with the G43! 4. Taurus G2C If you’re really on a budget then you need to give the Taurus G2C a close look! It’s about the size of a Sig P365, it’s double-stack 12+1, and it is VERY reliable. Johnny did a complete hands-on review and video of it and gave it a raving good rating! He ran a bunch of steel and defensive ammo through it and never had a problem, that is saying a LOT for a $200-ish pistol. For folks on a budget, the option to get a reliable gun with 12+1 capacity at this price is simply too good to ignore. The G2C has earned its place in the market. Taurus G2C 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing For more 9mm specific CCW guns…check out Best Single Stack Sub-Compact 9mm . .45 ACP Something to note before you get your boxers in a bunch is I left out 1911s because this is an article about concealed carry.  We have our Best 1911s article for that. Yes, you can carry a big gun if you want, but most want a smaller gun for their EDC. 5. Springfield Armory XD-S The XD-S, even though it had some issues a while back, is a great choice for your CCW. The large caliber in the small frame is helpful. Springfield XD(S) 3.3 480 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 480 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It’s thin and easy to conceal, a combination that isn’t easy to find in a real larger caliber. Because of the shorter barrel and the larger caliber, it kicks and can make reacquiring your target more difficult when firing quickly. You’ll probably need to train a little more with that than you would with a 9mm. But extra training should be assumed when you’re working with .45 ACP. 6. FN FNX-45 The FN FNX-45 is a bigger gun compared to some of the others listed so far. It is a compact size, so the barrel is a bit longer. If you are looking for something for your large hands, this would be a good option. FNX-45 700 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 700 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I got to shoot one of these and it was smooth for a compact 45. It was a little large for me to carry (I’m 5’11 170), but like the way it fired. The FNX-45 also comes in a Tactical version that sports a threaded barrel, red dot mounting ability, a rail, and suppressor hight sights. While highly impractical for CCW, it makes for an outstanding duty, open carry, and competition pistol. FNX-45 Tactical 1150 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1150 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Using one of each for your different needs makes it easier to transition between the two and makes training much simpler. .380 A .380 is a very concealable weapon. .380 ACP Round They are usually thinner and smaller than a 9mm subcompact. You will lose some of the impact you get when a .380 hits the target, but they are still acceptable for self-defense. Though it didn’t make the list…here’s us shooting the Bersa Firestorm .380: You’ll want to read up on the differences and limitations of the .380 Auto, and we have Just the Article for You . Same bullet, smaller casing. Something you might want to look into right away if you are getting a .380 is a new trigger. Most of them have a long pull and can make them hard to shoot accurately under duress. 7. Ruger LCP II The Ruger LCP II is a popular small gun and a large improvement over the older LCP model. It comes in different colors so finding the one you like aesthetically is easy. Most Affordable .380 Pistol Ruger LCP II .380 299 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 299 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Because of its size, the LCP II is a great “pocket” gun or even as a backup weapon. It has a 6+1 magazine which is pretty common for this size pistol. We also have a complete review on the Ruger LCP II so you can learn all amount the pros and cons of this little guy. 8. Glock 42 The Glock 42 is a great choice if you are looking for a reliable single stack .380 or if you are Glock fan and want something a little smaller than their other offerings. Most Reliable .380 Glock 42 399 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 399 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Not a lot can be said, other than a thank you to Glock for starting to make some guns with a single stack magazine. Besides that…it’s a Glock. Its bombproof, reliable, has massive aftermarket support, and people either hate it or love it. For more .380…check out our 5 Best .380 Pistols for Concealed Carry . .38 Special A .38 Special or .38 special +P are very common calibers for revolvers and don’t really show up in semi-auto pistols. .38 Special vs .357 Magnum When it comes to a revolver for CCW , lightweight and hammerless are two of the characteristics I recommend looking into. 9. Bodyguard 38 Revolver Crimson Trace Smith & Wesson makes a lot of revolvers and a lot of them have a .38 Special version. Smith & Wesson M&P Bodyguard 38 Crimson Trace 470 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 470 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing S&W revolvers come in almost every shape, finish, size, and option you can think of. This one is super lightweight since it uses a one-piece aluminum frame and a very short barrel. It’s handy, easy to use, and rated for +P. Everything you could want in a CCW revolver. 10. Ruger LCRx The LCRx is a lightweight revolver from Ruger. An aluminum frame and some polymer parts make it a great carry gun. Ruger LCRx 500 at Cabela's Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 500 at Cabela's Prices accurate at time of writing It has an exposed hammer, so you’ll want to practice your draw to make sure you can do it well and not snag clothing. It’s also able to fire +P rounds for a little more punch. If the exposed hammer is an issue for you though, Ruger also makes the LCR that uses an internal hammer for smoother draws. Best Laser Equipped Ruger LCR Revolver 500 at Cabela's Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 500 at Cabela's Prices accurate at time of writing For more .38 Special revolvers…check out 7 Best CCW .38 Revolvers . Holsters, Belts, & Ammo Going concealed with the perfect gun for you is still useless if you don’t have a great holster. Concealment Express Attachment Options We go through all the different types of concealed carry methods…and a bunch of our favorite holsters. Hidden Hybrid Holsters Assortment Plus with videos! Check out our top holster picks for all the popular ways to carry. Plus you’ll need a sturdy belt that doesn’t scream “I’m carrying a gun.”  Check out these nondescript options in Best CCW Gun Belts . Best CCW Gun Belts, Thickness Same goes with ammo… we use data from shorter handguns and clothed ballistics gel to make our choices. Since that’s what you’re likely to see in the real world. Ballistics-Gel-Testing See our self-defense and range ammo picks for all the popular calibers. 9mm 147 Federal Hydrashok HST Final Thoughts In this list, there are some popular models of various calibers to get you started in your search. Some are subcompact, some are not. In the .38 Special category, they are all revolvers and in the .45 ACP category, there are bigger guns. Take a look at your lifestyle. This will have a big impact on what and when you will carry. Look for a CCW that will be convenient and comfortable to carry or you just won’t. Comfort comes from how it fits your hand as well as how it feels carrying it on your person. Just because you aren’t strapping a pair of 1911s in shoulder holsters every time you leave your man cave doesn’t mean you aren’t going to be safe. Get a 9mm or .380 that fits your hand and you can conceal in the majority of the clothing wear daily. Lots of Holsters, Boondock Saints And as a reminder if you scan articles like I do: Everyone has their favorites and there will be comments about this gun or that gun should be on or off the list. Feel free to interject, but leave useful comments and suggestions. We have some more specific articles too if you already know what you want: Best New CCW Guns Best Revolvers for Concealed Carry Top 5 .380 Pistols for CCW "Best Single Stack" Sub-Compacts Best .22s for Pocket Carry We love to hear from our readers about their CCW choices, so let us know! What handgun do you use? What caliber? Tell us all about it in the comments!  And then head to our CCW Definitive Guide .

A Shotgun Caliber Guide: An Intro Into Ammo And Its Functionality

A Shotgun Caliber Guide: An Intro Into Ammo And Its Functionality

Advertisment Shotguns are some of the most versatile weapons in the world. The key to this versatility is their ammo types and what these ammo types deliver. A 12 gauge shotgun caliber can be used to kill animals as small as birds and as big as bears. They are effective home defense weapons and can engage a target as close as one foot and far away as 100 yards. Everything a shotgun can do is dependent on the ammo loaded into it. Unfortunately, a lot of versatility means a lot of different ammo types which can be confusing. Today we are putting together a shotgun ammo guide to demystify shotgun calibers. Shotguns are the only small arm I know measured in gauges. A gauge is a very old way to measure the inside of the bore. The gauge of a shotgun caliber is determined by the number of solid spheres of lead that will fit down the bore of the weapon. The number that measures the gauge is derived from how many lead spheres of that size it will take to equal a pound. If I took a pound of lead and divided it into 12 equally sized spheres those would be 12 gauge spheres. It’s odd and not important to know, but I wanted to share. What is important to know is that the smaller the number the larger the shotgun is. So a 20 gauge is smaller than a 12 gauge. A 10 gauge is bigger than a 12 gauge. To make things even more confusing there is a single shotgun caliber measured in inches and that’s .410. There are lots of shotgun calibers out there, but the three most common are 12 gauge, 20 gauge, and .410. Slightly uncommon calibers include 28 gauge, 16 gauge, and 10 gauge. Rare calibers include 8 and 4 gauge which isn’t a concern. For home defense and hunting 20 and 12 gauge tend to be the preeminent calibers with .410 lagging slightly behind. Shell Length Shotgun shells come in a variety of different lengths and they will often depend on the caliber of the shotgun shell. The longer the shell the more shot it is capable of holding, but bigger shells offer more recoil. Your shotgun will determine if the length of shell you can use. As we’ve established the three most common shotgun shells are 12 gauge, 20 gauge, and .410. The common lengths are: For 12 Gauge – 2 ¾ inches, 3 inches, and 3.5 inches For 20 Gauge – 2 ¾, 2 ⅝, and 3 inches For 410 – 2.5 inches and 3 inches Super Short Shells I’ll mention these because they have become quite popular in the last couple of years. These 1 ¾ inch shells are for 12 gauges only and can be buckshot, birdshot, and slugs. They extend the capacity of a shotgun significantly and have very low recoil compared to full-sized shells. Shotgun Caliber Types There are three main categories of shotgun calibers and these different categories typically determine what you are going to do with that caliber. There is also specialty ammo that we’ll briefly talk about, but for the average civilian these are not a major concern. To understand shotguns and shotgun ammo you have to understand shot. A “shot” is a term that describes several spherical balls packed into a shotgun shell. Shot varies in size as well as the number of projectiles in a shell. The larger the projectiles the less of them you can cram in a shell and vice versa. Buck Buckshot is a larger size of shotgun caliber primarily dedicated to killing medium-sized gam e. The buck in buckshot is a reference to killing deer. Buckshot varies in size, but the majority of sizes are capable of defensive use. Shot sizes are range between 0000 to T. Sounds confusing right? Well, let’s break it down and make it a bit simpler. You can find each and every size here. 0000 – Pronounced Quadruple Ought: A Semi-custom load made up of 9.5mm pellets designed for power and penetration. Perfect for hunting feral hogs and even bear. It is incredibly powerful and features sharp recoil. 000 – Pronounced Triple Ought: A powerful load designed for medium to large game. It offers 9.1mm sized shot and is well suited for hunting. It does feature some heavy recoil. 00 – Pronounced Double Ought: The most common buckshot load for 12 gauges. Used for defensive shooting and hunting. An excellent balance of both power and managed recoil. 0 – Pronounced Single Ought: Single Ought offers a similar-sized shot to 00 with less recoil. Best suited for those who are recoil sensitive and want a good defensive and hunting load. #1 Buck – #1 buckshot offers an excellent balance of shot, power and recoil control. #1 buckshot is slightly uncommon but excellent for home defense and hunting medium-sized game. #2 and #3 Buckshot – Buckshot designed for 20 gauge shotguns that offer both effective shot size and shot amount for the smaller 20 gauge shotgun. #4 buck is a good hunting round for fixed choked shotguns and has declined in popularity as shotgun chokes have gotten better at controlling shot. It has had a slight resurgence for home defense use. F and T buckshot loads also exist and these odd types of buckshot are best suited for hunting moderate-sized animals like coyotes. Bird Birdshot is a shotgun caliber named because it’s designed to be effective against birds. It’s small enough to kill birds without damaging them extensively. It also casts a wide net that makes it easy to hit moving targets. There are tons of different birdshot loads available for different sized birds. Here is a quick rundown of most birdshot loads. You can find each and every load here. #9 Shot – The smallest of birdshot, best used for clay pigeons and not live birds. #8.5 Shot – Another small shot designed for clay pigeons, but offers slightly more recoil as well as more range than #9. #8 Shot – Another popular load for clay pigeons, but it can be used for the smallest of game like rabbits, squirrels, and doves. #7.5 Shot – Perfect for small birds like doves. It’s also cheap, common, and excellent for training purposes. #7 Shot – Small shot designed for dove, grouse, and pheasant. Also great for bigger squirrels. #6 Shot – This mid-size birdshot can be used for game as large as ducks at short ranges, but also perfect for squirrel and head shotting larger birds. #5 Shot – This shot size goes for bigger birds and is another excellent choice for duck hunting at most ranges. Will also take birds like pheasants at a distance. #4 Shot – This is different than #4 Buck. It’s a large birdshot size designed for taking birds as big as Turkeys. #3 Shot – Designed for large birds like turkeys and waterfowl. Provides more range and power than Number 4. #2 Shot – This load is excellent for hunting geese and delivers excellent penetration. It’s also a good choice for hitting moderate-sized birds at greater distances. #1 Shot – A shot load that’s kind of hard to find. It does deliver a lock of knockdown power for hitting large birds like geese at greater ranges. BB Shot – The largest birdshot that can be used for bigger birds, as well as smaller mammals at close range. Slug Slugs are solid projectiles like rifle rounds and are incredibly potent. They extend the effective range of a shotgun to 100 yards and cna drop deer, bears, and people. Slugs are powerful and come in a variety of different weights designed for different tasks. Slugs will vary based on your needs. You’ll choose a slug based on your task as well as its weight. Looking for a Slug? Then you came to the right place. Specialty Calibers Specialty ammo for shotguns are popular and range from useful for niche tasks to just fun stuff. Niche specialty ammo includes less-lethal loads of rubber buckshot or rubber slugs, as well as rounds designed to breach locks at close quarters. Fun rounds include things like dragon’s breath that blasts a flame 25 feet from the barrel of the gun. Other fun rounds include flares, fireworks, and other loads designed for less serious uses. Specialty rounds aren’t a major concern when it comes to serious use of shotguns unless you are military or police. Parting Shots Shotgun ammunition seems confusing, but in reality, once you establish what your goal is you can choose the right load for you. Shotguns are powerful, versatile weapons and mastering round selection is an important task. Once you do, you’ll begin your mastery of the shotgun.

Best 6.8 SPC Barrels You Have Questions, We Have Answers

If you are looking for a more potent alternative to the 5.56 NATO for an AR-15 rifle, you will encounter lots of options, but for universal use, the best cartridge is the 6.8 Remington SPC (6.8x43mm), especially when used in shorter barrels. Unlike the 6.8 SPC round, purpose-built from the very beginning for optimal performance in the shorter barrels, the .223 Remington/5.56NATO round was designed for 20-inch barrels that are not quite as popular for close quarter fighting. In other words, firing 6.8mm ammo will give better performance from the ubiquitous SBR than the 5.56mm can give you from the shorter barrel. In this article, we are going to take a closer look at some of the best 6.8 SPC barrels currently on the market. Comparison of the Best 6.8 SPC Barrels IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick AR-15 Recon Barrel 6.8 SPC II Fluted barrel for better cooling and lesser weight Veratile barrel in terms of length and performance High-quality barrel with precision muzzle crown and CNC markings View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Wilson Combat Match Grade Barrel 6.8 II SPC Fluted 16" 1-11 Twist Stainless WC Match-grade AR barrel designed for precision shooting Suppressor ready barrel for noise reduction Shorter barrel for CQB and easy handling "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" What is the Optimal Barrel Length for the 6.8 SPC? Developed in response to objections about the stopping power of the 5.56 mm ammo, the 6.8 SPC ammunition aimed to improve on 5.56mm NATO cartridge lethality from the M4 carbine (16-inch barrel). By the book, the 6.8mm Remington SPC was conceived for 12" to 16" barrels, currently most familiar in a short-barreled rifle (SBR)/carbine platforms. The 6.8 SPC is capable of pushing .277 caliber, 110gr bullets from 16" barrel easily up to 2,500 ft/s, significantly improving terminal ballistics over a 5.56x45mm NATO 77gr with MV of 2,679 ft/s. Source Furthermore, the 5.56 ballistic performance in the AR-15 platform will decrease when you start chopping down the barrel length. The 6.8 SPC ammo does quite well from shorter barrels since it was specifically designed for efficiency in a short-barreled rifle (SBR). While the performance of the 6.8 SPC out of a 16" barrel is arguably second to none in an AR pattern service rifle, it gains minimum velocity as barrel length is increased. As a final verdict, by increasing barrel length beyond 16 inches, you might get a bit of extra power from a longer barrel, but it would be not enough for most applications to be worth the hassle. Perks of Upgrading Your 6.8 SPC Barrel As mentioned earlier, the barrel length in the 6.8 SPC caliber may have a slight influence on the ballistics performance and hence, on your shooting style, but the "optimum barrel length" really depends upon your intended use. In fact, testing has found that the velocity benefit you can gain is about 30fps per inch from 16" to 20" barrel lengths, depending on loads. So, a 20" barrel will provide long-range precision, boasting slightly higher velocities and slightly less bullet drop. At the other end of the spectrum, using a 6.8 SPC in a 12.5" SBR or shorter AR pistol configuration is the perfect solution for vehicle and home defense. However, the most popular is the 16" carbine which provides you about 85%-90% of the 6.8 cartridge's maximum velocity. Besides, this is the shortest length legally allowed in most states.  It is also a handy size but still shoots great in groups, making it an ideal weapon for carrying on-foot, during the day, or nighttime hog hunts up to about 200 yards. Features to Consider When Buying a New 6.8 SPC Barrel The quality of the barrel is the crown jewel of any AR-project and before you start investing in barrels to expand your shooting capabilities, you should consider a couple of features that would determine the future use of your 6.8 rifle. First, you should look for a 6.8 SPC II chamber, as this is the corrected version of the original 6.8, chambering with better performance and readily available for purchase from the large majority of barrel manufactures. Generally, the 6.8 SPC is a multi-purpose rifle but when building the 6.8 upper for specific tasks, you should know that you cannot assemble a great shooting AR rifle/carbine without a great barrel. The evolution of the AR-15/M16 barrel ranges from the original lightweight 20” rifle barrel all the way up to the most popular barrel profile today known as the 14.5″ military M4 barrel. While the original pencil-style, or “A1”, barrels were good for snapping off single shots, they were not as good for full-auto shooting. Therefore, development moved toward heavier profiles, so there were new barrels designed called the Special Purpose Rifle (SPR) and Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR) barrels with a length of 18 and 20 inches respectively. These barrels are not designed for the shooting type known as “spray and pray” but rather for slow, precise, and methodical shooting. M4 Carbine ( Source ) However, one particularly popular profile for the rifles which features a 6.8 SPC II chamber is stainless, 16″ long barrel often called "Recce" or "Recon". These barrels are more massive under the front guard providing useful thermal mass to absorb a lot of shooting. There are also other profiles available in AR barrels but there’s another way to get lighter weight and that is vertical cannelure, or fluting. In this process, gun makers remove material from the barrel’s outer surface in grooves that run lengthwise along part of the barrel. Next, is a "dimpling" process with a lot of dimples along the barrel's surface. While the fluting makes barrels lighter, both processes produce better thermal efficiency in shedding heat. While the original 5.56 AR-15s have barrels with 1:14 twist, the current M4 carbines come with a twist rate of one turn per seven inches. Since the 6.8 SPC II rifles prefer bullets weighing between 90 and 110 grains, you should stay away from barrels with a 9.5 twist, in favor of using a 1:11 twist as often as possible. Beyond these considerations, you should also pay attention to muzzle threads. Some gun authors advocate the avoidance of barrels with a 1/2-28 muzzle thread on a 6.8 since the attested and proven muzzle thread for this caliber is 5/8x24 threads per inch. Quick Take - The Best 6.8 SPC Barrels These are our recommendations for the best 6.8 SPC barrels: AR-15 Recon Barrel 6.8 SPC II AR-15 Ranger Barrel 6.8 SPC II 6.8 SPC II Barrel 20 in Stainless Steel Review of the Best 6.8 SPC Barrels We have picked some of the best barrels for 6.8 SPC in the market and weighed their pros & cons in detail for you to choose the one which suits your needs and taste. 1. Wilson Combat AR-15 Recon Barrel 6.8 SPC II Wilson Combat is a household name in the AR-15 aftermarket industry and their stainless steel fluted 16” match-grade Recon Tactical barrel can handle a range of tasks, from plinking and all-purpose field applications to hardcore hunting. This Wilson barrel comes with a  “Recon” fluted profile that enhances rigidity while remaining lightweight. As an added benefit, the fluting is also designed to provide greater cooling for long strings of fire. The Wilson Combat 6.8 Recon 16-inch, medium contour, match-grade barrel is machined with a mid-length gas system and hand polished M4-style feed ramps and passed the complete and rigorous final inspection process. These proven 6.8 SPC II barrels feature a precision muzzle crown with 5/8" x 24 muzzle threads and crisp CNC markings. For gilt-edge accuracy, each Wilson Combat AR-15 Recon barrel offers a four-groove precision button rifling with a 1:11" twist rate for excellent performance with bullet weights from 85 to 115 grains. Buy Now Pros A 1-11" Twist Rate Weighs 33 Ounces Match-Grade Barrel Stainless Steel Barrel M4-Style Feed Ramps Mid-Length Gas System 5/8x24 threaded muzzle Increased Surface Area Provides Better Cooling Cons A Bit Pricey Not Lightweight Bottom Line Combining a match-grade barrel that is four inches shorter than the M16A4 main battle rifle and 416R stainless steel, the Wilson 6.8 Spec II Chambered Recon Barrel is perfect for any build requiring reduced mass and increased durability. 2. Wilson Combat AR-15 Ranger Barrel 6.8 SPC II The venerable Wilson Combat has released an AR rifle series dubbed the Ranger, designed as a reliable, easy-to-carry hunting rifle where lightweight is a prerequisite. For the AR-15 series, Wilson Combat has developed a Ranger match-grade, tapered barrel available in 14.7″ or 16-inch lengths, depending on the caliber. If you are building a fast-handling, precision AR carbine, then you should consider the Wilson Combat Ranger profile barrels as the lightest contour of Wilson AR barrels. The company’s model TR68RAMG16RT11 in 6.8 SPC II chamber is available with a 16″ barrel and weighs less than 27 ounces, making it one of the lightest barrels on the market. The barrel is machined of Type 416R stainless steel for longevity and comes with a mid-length gas system and a standard .750-inch gas-block journal. The Ranger barrel also sports M4-style feed ramps while the barrel top features 5/8x 24 threaded muzzles. For exceptional accuracy with standard bullet weights between 90 and 110 grains, the new Wilson Combat AR-15 Ranger barrel combines six groove button-rifling with a right hand 1:11" twist rate. Actually, this match-grade barrel offers extraordinary accuracy for such a light profile and out-shoots average shooting mechanics as it keeps sub 1/2 MOA groups at 100yds. Although the Wilson Combat barrels are made to mil-spec standards, there are rare complaints on final quality control concerning incorrectly cut chambers. Buy Now Pros A 1-11" Twist Rate Weight: 27 ounces M4-style Feed Ramps Match-Grade 16″ Barrel Stainless Steel  Material Muzzle Threads: 5/8x24." Gas System Length: Mid-Length Finish: Matte Bead-Blasted Stainless Extra Lightweight Barrel Reduces Weight to a Minimum Cons Not for Rapid-Fire Shooting Occasional Omissions in QC Bottom Line "The Wilson Combat" Ranger barrel is ideal for upgrading an existing AR-15 to cut down the weight of their black rifle without any accuracy loss. In addition to making a rifle easier to carry for long periods of time, the 16″  Ranger barrel increases speed when transitioning between targets. 3. Black Hole Weaponry 6.8 SPC II Barrel 20 in Stainless Steel (Ebay) Columbia River Arms has recently acquired "Black Hole Weaponry" , but they continue to make custom rifle barrels using state-of-the-art technology. If you want substantial accuracy improvements in AR platforms, then the BHW/CRA barrels are an excellent value for upgrading your standard AR's accuracy. Black Hole Weaponry barrels employ the use of match-grade 416R stainless steel with a Rockwell 27 and utilize polygonal twist rifling typically found in Glock and H&K firearms. Unlike the traditional sharp-edged lands and grooves, this arc-shaped rifling offers gentle hill and valley forms to add accuracy, reduced gas cutting, increased velocity, and ease of cleaning. This BHW 20-inch barrel features Caudle 3 land polygonal rifling, 1:11 twist rifling, and 6.8 SPC II chamberings. Unlike general five-groove rifling, three-groove polygonal rifling is more of a match style of rifling for longer barrel precision weapons where accuracy is a must. The Black Hole Weaponry barrel with code AR15-6.8SPC-1x11-20-CON is highly configurable in terms of several custom fluting options and contours. This particular 20-inch HBAR barrel comes with the recommended rifle-length gas system, Bull profile, and straight fluting. Paired with 5/8" x 24 muzzle threads, this setup provides heavy barrel accuracy with good heat management. All Black Hole Weaponry custom rifle barrels have passed the magnetic particle inspections (MPI) and further non-destructive testing to ensure the integrity of each barrel. Though sometimes you will not get complete instructions, as a standard procedure, you need to fire about 50 rounds to break in the barrel properly. Buy Now on Ebay Pros Made in the U.S.A. Threading (TPI): 5/8x24." Barrel Finish: Matte Black The M4 Feed Ramp is Included Barrel Length: 20" H-Bar (Bull Profile) Barrel Material: 416R Stainless Steel Rifling: 1:11" Polygonal Three Groove The Barrels Passed MPI (Magnetic Particle Inspections) Cons Higher Price Tag It May Lack Break-In Instructions Bottom Line If you are looking for sub-MOA accuracy and are focused on building high-end Black rifles, Black Hole Weaponry has match-grade polygonal rifled barrel upgrades capable of holding accuracy during sustained fire. 4. Wilson Combat "Match Grade Barrel" , 6.8 SPC II, Recon SR Tactical (Ebay) Wilson Combat manufactures over 40 different variations of barrels in six popular chamberings. Nevertheless, if you wish to build your own general-purpose rifle well-equipped for hunting, home defense, or tactical competition, Wilson Combat is offering their Recon Tactical profile 14.7" barrel. With the Recon configuration, your 6.8 SPC AR swings easily and quickly during tactical shooting, without sacrificing any accuracy. This medium-weight, 14.7-inch match-grade barrel is crafted from 416R rifle rated stainless steel making it ideal for a high rate of fire. While the 14.7 Tactical-Recon 6.8 SPC barrel features hand polished bore and M4-style feed ramps, its machining and precision button rifling is absolutely flawless providing superb accuracy with .5-inch groups being common. The SR stands for "Suppressor Ready" meaning the muzzle features 5/8×24-TPI threading, which optimizes the build of your AR platform so it can accept sound suppressors. Besides the "Suppressor Ready” feature for secure flash hider/suppressor attachment pinning, the Wilson Combat 6.8 SPC 14.7" SR barrels are also great for non-suppressed application. To avoid the short barreled rifle (SBR) configuration subject to NFA rules and to stay away from registering the carbine as an NFA weapon, your barrel should meet the 16” minimum barrel length requirement for legal rifle ownership. In that case, you do need to permanently attach a muzzle brake/flash hider of sufficient length to bring the barrel up to 16". Other Recon barrel features include a matte bead blast finish with a 1:11” twist rate and mid-length gas system. Buy Now on Ebay Pros Short 14.7” Barrel 4-style Feed Ramps Weight: 30.8 Ounces Muzzle Threads: 5/8-24 "Gas System Length" : Mid-Length Finish: Matte Bead-Blasted Stainless Match-Grade 416R "Stainless Steel Barrel" Profile: Recon SR Tactical - Suppressor Ready A 1-11" Twist Rate With Precision Button Rifling Cons Need a Permanently Attached Muzzle Device to be NFA Legal Bottom Line If you want precision accuracy in a small package, you should consider Wilson Recon SR 14.7” barrel for your next custom AR rifle project. Installation of the Recon SR 14.7” in your build rifle is great for CQB circumstances but also with a permanently attached flash hider or muzzle brake it maintains a handy, optimized size and weight profile without sacrificing any reliability. Conclusion Today, when many AR aficionados are building a number of different tasks focused on high-end ARs, the heart of every project would be a match-grade barrel, which can net the most significant benefits. Regardless of whether you are planning to use your 6.8 SPC chambered AR-15 as a practical, all-around AR set up or as "Designated Marksman Rifle" (DMR), all of these missions demand a compromise between handling and weight for carrying, as well as muzzle velocity and heat absorption for optimum accuracy. More 6.8 SPC Buyer Guides 6.5 Grendel vs. 6.5 Creedmoor vs. 6.8 SPC Magazines Scopes Uppers ​​Informational Hunting Overview

Real Men Crochet Paracord

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d82414b4_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d82414b4_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Crochet Paracord: Just Another Reason to Learn Crocheting You can crochet with anything! And that means items you'd normally throw away can be turned into any number of handy items. I have seen multiple examples of projects crocheted from plastic bags, T-shirt fabric and even cassette tapes . I will even admit to a single occasion when I attempted to crochet with licorice. It is very difficult as the strands break easily and just taste so good. The point is that crochet skills are a tool to turn any length of material into pouches, bags, netting, cords, belts and more . Related GunDigest Articles Real Avid Introduces the Gun Boss AK47 Cleaning Kit Photos: 5 Best Survival Handguns This is especially true when it comes time to crochet paracord for later use. Why to Learn How to Crochet Paracord A few days ago, my dad sent me a short video about a guy who knits with parachute cord, allowing him to create a strong strap and convert a large length of cord to a utilitarian and manageable length. This practice is popular with those preparing for emergencies, outdoors enthusiasts and many others. In a situation that demands a length of parachute cord, it's important to be able to unravel paracord in a hurry. While some wear paracord bracelets for this purpose, going the DIY route and crocheting paracord is a good choice for making customized widths and lengths of paracord. Instead of just paracord bracelets, you could make any number of wearable options.

Summary

The 4 Best Scopes for Scar 17 – Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by Keary O. / CC BY The Scar 17 is one of the most modern, heavy hitting battle rifles out there. Designed by FN and marketed to the Special Operation community, the SCAR 17 has the ergonomics of an assault rifle but with the powerful .